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Monday, 19 July 2010

Leviathan at Work at the Police Force - Saturday's Flash Flood

Last Saturday's flash floods as a result of the heavy morning downpour came as no surprise since a majority of Singaporeans has already considered such occurences as not mere "once-in-50years-events".

What was perhaps more shocking was the behaviour of a policeman as reported by Lianhe Wanbao.

Chinese daily Lianhe Wanbao reports that one of its photographers was arrested and detained by police for one hour for taking photos of Saturday morning’s flood.

Wanbao also included a police statement which said the photographer was detained for safety reasons because the policeman in question thought Mr Wu was in danger and would hurt himself while taking photos. Is this really the case?

In view of the recent frequency of floods which is causing adverse publicity for the Govt, is the policeman preventing the press photographers from doing his job? His action of having to handcuff the photographer and detaining him for questioning was suspicious of his actual intention while the police statement claimed it was for the "safety" of the photographer.

Anyway as the photographer was not an accused "CRIMINAL", was there any need for the policeman on duty to handcuff him for questioning as if he had committed an offence? His aggressive act did not suggest the good intention of ensuring "safety" of the photographer.

This incident clearly illustrates the "Leviathan" mindset of the police officer, which is typical of Singapore Authorities. Even if the police officer had meant good intention, the question remains - was he instructed to prevent the taking of "flood" photographs, first of all, and by whom? Is there any "standing order"?


Reference :-

By yahoosingapore – July 18th, 2010

Even as many Singaporeans and businesses come to grips with the aftermath of Saturday morning’s flash floods, another story is raising eyebrows online.

Chinese daily Lianhe Wanbao reports that one of its photographers was arrested and detained by police for one hour for taking photos of Saturday morning’s flood.

In its Saturday evening edition, the local newspaper put a photo of its photographer, with visible handcuff marks still on his wrist, and that of a policeman side by side on its front page, under a headline that said, “Photographer arrested because of taking photos”.

In a Page 5 report, the newspaper detailed how its photographer, Mr Wu Qing Shun, was detained by police for one hour before being allowed to leave.

His detention at about 7am on Saturday took place after a policeman saw him taking photos of snarling traffic and stranded vehicles along Upper Bukit Timah Road, one of the areas badly hit by Saturday morning’s floods.

After being spotted by an unidentified on-duty policeman who was mobilised to deal with the traffic situation, Mr Wu was asked to leave the scene.

However, he pleaded with the policeman to be allowed to take one more photograph.

Before he could finish talking, the policeman took out his handcuffs and placed them on his right hand. He was also told he would be brought down to a police station.

The photographer then asked, “I am not a criminal. Why are you handcuffing me?”

The policeman then brought him to the roadside and told him to wait for an investigator.

Mr Wu was only released after an hour.

Wanbao also included a police statement which said the photographer was detained for safety reasons because the policeman in question thought Mr Wu was in danger and would hurt himself while taking photos.

It was only after flood waters had subsided did he let the photographer go.

The news has sparked outrage online as many questioned why the police detained the photographer for essentially doing what was his job.......

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